Saturday, May 12, 2007

Even Hedy Fry lasted four months

Making this perhaps the shortest leadership bid in Canadian history, Gilles Duceppe's one day campaign for PQ leadership has ended.

It was a great campaign by Duceppe, full of highs and lows. Let's look back at some of the highlights of his bid:

Friday, May 11: Gilles Duceppe announces intention to run for PQ leadership.
Saturday, May 12: Gilles Duceppe drops out of PQ leadership race.

They'll write books about this campaign!

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23 Comments:

  • Interesting CG, that the biggest single reason for the death spiral of the sovereigntists is the Rt. Hon Stephen Harper, yet Liberals, who always claim the cloak of fighting the separatists as their raison d'etre, seek to undermine him at every turn. It is clear that the Liberal party would support a re-invigorated separatist movement, if it would return them to power.

    The only good Liberal, is a dead Liberal.

    By Blogger Grithater, at 8:31 PM  

  • Is that a threat?

    By Blogger Glen, at 8:33 PM  

  • The separatist movement was in a death spiral well before Stephen Harper became PM. Adscam reinvigorated them (and, fair enough, blame the Liberals for that), but Harper has really only returned them to the level they were at circa 2000-2003.

    By Blogger calgarygrit, at 8:41 PM  

  • I think Harper has been trouble for separatists, but I agree they're already in trouble - he's just helping out in sealing the deal.

    I'm sure shocked by this turnaround - I think Duceppe just evaporated into a complete joke.

    By Blogger Jason Bo Green, at 9:10 PM  

  • Legitimizing the Fiscal Imbalance ????

    Yep. $1.6 Billion a year buys a lot of loyalty. Thanks Steve !!!

    Conservatives routinely destroy the financial viability of the Federal Government.

    I believe Brian Mulroney's government left the largest accumulated debt in Canada' s History as his legacy.

    No sooner are the Conservatives back in power, that they table a budget that sets new records for expenditure. Most of it with zero R.O.I.

    By Blogger Down & Out in L A, at 9:33 PM  

  • What a loser!

    By Blogger Jason Cherniak, at 9:34 PM  

  • Jason,

    Better be a loser than be humiliated.

    And there are no guarantees that the Bloc will welcome him back in open arms.

    By Blogger Mushroom, at 9:45 PM  

  • It is rather amusing... this is sort of a leadership race version of the funny hat he wore in that infamous picture.

    By Blogger Sean Cummings, at 10:26 PM  

  • "What a loser!"

    From one who sure can pick 'em! Well, I guess Mr. Cherniak might just be thankful that someone can make M. Dion look decisive.

    After all, the last time we all heard from the Fearless Liberal Leader he had to send out his minions to claim on air that Dion didn't actually mean anything Dion had said that very morning.

    Abiding a decision for almost a whole day looks downright decisive by comparison.

    By Blogger paul.obeda@, at 2:02 AM  

  • What a hypocritical hack! Jason, that is - not Duceppe. This being, of course, the "green" fuckwit who prattles on and on about the environment and proudly states "I'm loving my air conditioning" on facebook -- in May.

    By Blogger Jason Bo Green, at 8:57 AM  

  • You know, they actually might write books about this leadership bid... it could prove very revealing, one day. (Or, not.)

    By Blogger Jason Bo Green, at 8:59 AM  

  • You know, this seems like the kind of thing that could have been completely avoided with a five minute phone call between Duceppe and Marois before either of them announced.

    By Blogger Josh, at 1:35 PM  

  • irreverent, iconoclstic, ecléctic e liberty

    http://telamamaria.blogspot.com
    in Catalonia - Spain

    thank

    By Blogger Té la mà Maria, at 3:24 PM  

  • Glen: "Is that a threat?" No, you infant, it is a lament. Beside, killing Grits would be like cutting a head off the hydra, two more would grow in it's place.

    You know Glen, people who have taken risks and met a payroll get disgusted by those who haven't telling them how to run their lives. This is the fundamental problem we have with Liberals, as they have evolved from the magnificent party of Laurier, to the statist freakshow of today.

    Why will I undoubtedly be forced to run my business according to whims of a 30-40 year old dilletante, a drama teacher with less than 2 years actual paid work on his CV, a man who lacks the intelligence to earn a science degree, a man who has to look up the word "mortgage"? Because a bunch of sleazebag Librano lawyers see that empty vessel as their quickest route back to living like parasites off the fruits of my labours.

    A threat? I wouldn't compliment Librano filth with threats.

    By Blogger Grithater, at 3:44 PM  

  • I was listening to Marois on CBC. She sounds good.

    She is going to forego the rhetoric and address the needs of Quebec voters. Don't write off the PQ. They could make a comeback.

    By Blogger JimTan, at 4:09 PM  

  • Well that's certainly a bizarre turn of events. Is he staying on as BQ leader? Because it would be a bit hard to take him seriously after that.

    Why will I undoubtedly be forced to run my business according to whims of a 30-40 year old dilletante, a drama teacher with less than 2 years actual paid work on his CV, a man who lacks the intelligence to earn a science degree, a man who has to look up the word "mortgage"?

    Maybe I missed something, but which esteemed member of the party is this a reference to? Also, I'm guessing the Liberal campaign bus ran over your dog or something.

    By Blogger IslandLiberal, at 4:55 PM  

  • I don't see how Duceppe can be ousted. There's a caucus tomorrow, and Duceppe wants to gauge his support there, but for two reasons I don't see how he can leave. First, because there's no one in line... Loubier left, Gauthier's out, Bigras's not ready Paquette isn't that strong. Secondly, Duceppe is well-liked by his caucus, MPs like Ménard (a Marois supporter), Mourani, Paquette and many others have welcomed the decision to pull back from the race. Duceppe has been so important for the Bloc, he solidified its identity, he's well-liked, a great worker, and a rational man. Even though he's a political opponent, I respect him a lot and see him as a great politician, although he's had serious problems since Harper's been PM.

    I believe that anyone who thinks that the sovereignist movement is in a death spiral is either in denial, or does not have a good grasp of Québec politics. Polls that came out this week (for what they're worth) showed that with Duceppe, but especially with Marois, the PQ was ahead of the ADQ, and twice as many votes as the Liberal Party, as the only defender of Canadian federalism. Two years ago, most Québecers were in favor of secession from Canada - it might be that way again in two years, who knows. The PQ's poor performance in the last general election has been explained by PQ supporters by two major factors: Boisclair being out of touch with the rural folks (being gay and using a rather high level of language) and the frankly stupid pushing of a referendum - no one wants a referendum, even half of sovereignists don't. It's a bit sad, because Boisclair was the most intelligent of the three candidates, by far - he just totally lacked in political sense. Basically, the average Québecer is ok with sovereignty if Québec stays associated with Canada, and is ok with federalism if it's flexible. It doesn't want full secession, and it doesn't want rigid federalism - whichever side manages to be the most flexible will get the big part of the pie in Québec, in the post-Meech context. Bourassa and Dumont are great examples. Still, two thirds of Québecers voted against the status quo, against a more rigid concept of federation. That's highly significant. As a person who does not want to go into a whole other referendum deal, I think it's important not to gloat and underestimate the soveeignist movement, arrogance is probably not the best attitude to display in this case, I would believe. Moreover, as long as someone keeps denying the importance of the sovereignist movement, I think the more it hurts them.

    I think that the federal party best placed to win Québec is the Liberal Party, if and only if it manages to promote decentralization. The BQ will never get the federalist vote, but the Liberals can get the sovereignist vote. The Conservatives broke out in Québec with decentralization, but they just can't get a good score in the province due to their positions on the environment and Afghanistan, and socially conservative values will never go over in Montréal. The Liberals don't fundamentally scare Québecers like the Conservatives do, so if they can play the progressive card in urban areas and the decentralization card in rural Québec, I believe they can get a Québec majority. That gets them a good chance at getting the non-sovereignist BQ vote, as well as the progressive "autonomists". I don't know how it could play outside Québec, but I'm convinced that if they want to, the Liberals can get a Québec majority. Dion has the progressive part nailed, but he still carries the immense burden of the Clarity Act - if he can reposition himself, he can break out in Québec, I believe. In any case, the next federal election in Québec will be fascinating.

    I also think that Pauline Marois will be the first leader able to do whatever the hell she wants with the PQ since Lévesque in the 1970's. They won't kick her out, and she has all the legitimacy she wants to focus on why Québec sovereignty is desirable, rather than to needlessly hold a referendum. I personally prefer Duceppe, but Marois is as highly qualified as you'll ever see a leader. The PQ will have a real, strong leader in her. Her only image problem is that she, like Boisclair, gives the impression of being disconnected and sophisticated, which doesn't please to the average person, but she does have more warmth than Boisclair. There's no way, had you asked me a wek ago, that I would'v said Marois would be almost certainly the nxt PQ lader in sevn days' time.

    Finally, I think what happened to Boisclair is rather sad. Despite a flagrant lack of judgement, this man is incredibly brilliant, and had he waited another 10 or 15 years, could've been a very strong politician. I feel a bit sad for this man of integrity, great competence, intelligence and dignity. I wondr what it would've been like had he been straight.

    By Blogger jeagag, at 5:20 PM  

  • Grithater: "Glen: "Is that a threat?" No, you infant, it is a lament. Beside, killing Grits would be like cutting a head off the hydra, two more would grow in it's place."

    How does that analogy even work? It's not like we grow in caves and suddenly spring forth when we hear the final death throes of another Liberal.

    Grithater: "You know Glen, people who have taken risks and met a payroll get disgusted by those who haven't telling them how to run their lives."

    Tell me about it - my dad got hit hard by income trusts.

    By Blogger Glen, at 7:15 PM  

  • It's not like we grow in caves and suddenly spring forth when we hear the final death throes of another Liberal.

    We don't?

    By Blogger IslandLiberal, at 8:17 PM  

  • jaegag said

    “Moreover, as long as someone keeps denying the importance of the sovereignist movement, I think the more it hurts them.”

    Yes, Quebec nationalism is a matter of identity founded on the basis of the Two Solitudes. These emotional issues are the hardest to kill. The intangible opponent is the easiest to underestimate.

    That said, we must avoid Quebec-centric concessions. The Meech Lake Accord was a clear case of such. And it failed. The controversy created a legacy of bitterness and distrust.

    Decentralization should proceed where it is appropriate and useful for all provinces.

    By Blogger JimTan, at 12:34 AM  

  • While I prefer a pan-Canadian solution like you, jimtan, I don't mind a Québec-centric concessions, as long as it doesn't harm other provinces. I suppose there's always the "giving in to Québec (is helping the separatists!)" resentment in the ROC, which I guess is understandable, but hardly rational.

    The problem lies into what exactly should be done to satisfy everyone... which is probably not possible anyway. The failure of Meech is a good example of that - other than Québec's constitutional veto (which I could still see an argument for - it would still be nice for the largest and second most populous province to sign the damn thing!), I think the deal is totally fair to all provinces. I'd rather make a concession to Québec and put the secession question away for good, which would benefit all Canadians, than to give in to petty "we can't give in to Québec" arguments, which I think hurts all Canadians. If you take the resentment away, I think Meech is positive for everyone. Of course, that's only an opinion, a strong argument could probably be made by several people here against it, but I just wanted to show that making concessions to Québec doesn't have to hurt the ROC, it can actually benefit it too.

    By Blogger jeagag, at 2:08 AM  

  • I think grithater needs to get himself a soapbox to accompany his eloquence in verse. Either that or an actual platform to substantiate his eristic overtones. I'm not denouncing his opinions in the same way I'm not supporting them, but intelligent debate does not begin, include, or end with throwing insults.

    Great first paragraph though.

    By Blogger Mickie, at 5:10 PM  

  • There were a lot of well-deserved comments directed at Duceppe in Question Period today. My favourite is this one (I admit it, I'm biased) by Lawrence Cannon, the Conservatives' Quebec lieutenant:

    "I'm very pleased to see the leader of the Bloc with us. It's almost as if he never even left."

    By Blogger Brian in Calgary, at 9:50 PM  

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